Archaea

We can offer services in project managament and technical assistance within bio-remediation.

Our microbial products contains archaea, essential microbial nutrients and oxygen catalysts. All our microbial products are concentrated in a dry and dense powder. Activate the microbes at your convenience and on your timetable.

Our microbes have been selected for their large appetite to consume fuels and oils, both biochemically and physically. These microbes recycle simple, complex and chlorinated hydrocarbons into natural compounds.

Inspired by nature’s own method to clean up contaminated land and water, we use microbes from the Domain Archaea to clean up oil-spills on site. Archaea tolerate much harsher environmental conditions and degrade a wide variety of hydrocarbons. Our microbes recycle simple, complex and chlorinated hydrocarbons into natural compounds – cleaning nature with nature.

Archaea microbes recycle simple, complex and chlorinated hydrocarbons into natural compounds – cleaning nature with nature.

Bioremediation is the use of any organism metabolism to remove pollutants. Technologies can be generally classified as in situ or ex situ. In situ bioremediation involves treating the contaminated material at the site, while ex situ involves the removal of the contaminated material to be treated elsewhere. Some examples of bioremediation related technologies are phytoremediation, landfarming, bioreactor,composting, bioaugmentation, rhizofiltration, and biostimulation.

Bioremediation can occur on its own (natural attenuation or intrinsic bioremediation) or can be spurred on via the addition of fertilizers to increase the bioavailability within the medium (biostimulation). Recent advancements have also proven successful via the addition of matched microbe strains to the medium to enhance the resident microbe population’s ability to break down contaminants. Microorganisms used to perform the function of bioremediation are known as bioremediators.

The elimination of a wide range of pollutants and wastes from the environment requires increasing our understanding of the relative importance of different pathways and regulatory networks to carbon flux in particular environments and for particular compounds, and they will certainly accelerate the development of bioremediation technologies and biotransformation processes.